Young Cat Lover’s Booklist (Part 2)

Booklist:  Cats

Ages 4-8, unless otherwise noted

Don’t miss Part 1!

Ballet Kitty:  Ballet Class
Written by Bernette Ford
Illustrated by Sam Williams

Ballet Kitty and her two friends, Princess Pussycat and Ginger Tom, are off to their first ballet lesson with Mademoiselle Felicity.  Ballet Kitty has a new leotard, tutu and tights and—of course—ballet slippers that she is excited to wear.  Ginger Tom has new ballet slippers too, but he’s not sure about wearing them for class.  But the three kitties work hard, prancing and plié-ing and pointing their toes.  More about ballet than cats, this is nonetheless a cute story.  A great primer for little dancers about to take class for the first time, and I especially love the inclusion of a boy dancer.  Age 3+
Little Lit Lover says:  I like how they do all the things I do in ballet class:  the positions and plié and tendu! 
4 Flags

If You Give a Cat a Cupcake
Written by Laura Numeroff
Illustrated by Felicia Bond

For some, snack time isn’t a simple matter of giving a cat a cupcake, especially if the cat wants sprinkles with his cupcake.  Before you know it, you’ll have been to the beach, the gym and the museum!  A fun companion book to If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, and observant readers will be able to spot Mouse in this book.  A favorite in our household.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like when the cat rides on a whale and when he tries to carry a lot of stuff.
5 Flags

I Love Cats
Written and Illustrated by Barry Saltzberg

I Love Cats is narrated by a girl in purple pajamas who loves cats of all colors, as well as all standard kitty antics (pouncing, purring, prowling, pawing, etc),  and hopes you do too.  There is no plot to this book, and the pictures are also simple.  An okay book for a beginning reader, but not worth much beyond that.  I’d say this book would delight a young cat lover if discovered in the waiting room at the doctor’s office.  Age 3+
Little Lit Lover says: I like the cat who’s trying to get his shadow.
3 Flags

The Shy Little Kitten
Written by Cathleen Schurr
Illustrated by Gustaf Tenggren

The shy little kitten is born on a farm in a litter of six.  All the kittens live comfortably in the hay barn with their mother until the day they are old enough to line up and venture out.  The shy little kitten hangs back and finds herself at the end of the line.  She is distracted from following her family by a mole who pops up in her path, and quickly falls behind.  Since she can’t see where her family went, the kitten tags along with the mole and they meet a frog, a puppy and a squirrel before the kitten decides she ought to find her mother.  When she does come upon her family, the kitten finds a surprise waiting for her.  Not sure why the kitten is described as “shy” since she’s actually quite curious and adventurous.  This is a decent story, nothing special, with predictable baby animal adventures.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like the part when she meets the mole.
3 Flags

Splat the Cat
Written and Illustrated by Rob Scotton

Splat is nervous about starting school.  In fact he is so nervous he’ll think up any excuse not to go:  no clean socks, bad hair day, lamppost in the way.  When he finally arrives at school, one of Splat’s first lessons teaches that cats chase mice, and Splat’s anxiety grows.  He has his pet mouse, Seymour, in his lunchbox!  What will happen at lunchtime when Splat reveals his friend?  And will Splat ever want to return to school again?  Great harmony between text and illustrations makes this a very entertaining read.  Splat is another great character from the creator of Russell the Sheep.
Little Lit Lover says:  Splat makes funny faces!
5 Flags

Wabi Sabi
Written by Mark Reibstein
Illustrated by Ed Young

Wabi Sabi is a cat from Kyoto, Japan.  When she overhears her master say that her name is hard to understand, Wabi Sabi sets off to consult with some wise animals who might be able to explain the concept to her.  (“Wabi sabi” refers to the notion of finding beauty in the ordinary.)  This book opens vertically, giving each spread the feel of an unfurled Asian scroll. A haiku and Japanese verse appear on each spread, and the collage-style artwork give the illusion of texture and dimension.  Because of the abstract concept behind wabi sabi, this story may not appeal to young readers (hence 4 flags), but it is a gorgeous book that would be enjoyed by anyone with a love of cats and Asian culture.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like to say “wabi sabi!”
4 Flags

Part 3 coming soon!

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