Category Archives: Picture Books

Each Kindness

A library colleague (who has a terrific blog over at Great Kid Books) brought Each Kindness to my attention last fall and I finally got around to reading it for myself.  I am still reflecting on the book so what follows is less a review and more a reaction.  (For a great review of this title, head over here).

Each KindnessRipples in the water are a familiar metaphor for cause and effect, used here by award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson to teach young Chloe the impact of small acts of kindness.

When the principal introduces new student Maya, hardly anyone in the class bothers to greet her.  Chloe does not return Maya’s smile when the girls are seated next to each other.  Soon Maya is nicknamed “Never New” by her classmates because her clothes, shoes and toys all seem to have belonged to others before they belonged to Maya.  On the playground, Maya plays by herself because no one will join her, despite her invitations.  When she is absent no one notices.  One day, the teacher gives a lesson about kindness, using a small stone dropped into a bowl of water to show the ripple effect of being nice.  When it is Chloe’s turn to share an example of how she has been kind, all she can think of is how she wasn’t kind to Maya.  Though Chloe makes up her mind to smile at Maya the next chance she gets, Chloe finds out that she won’t have the chance because Maya won’t be coming back to class.  The story ends with Chloe’s wistful regrets.

The Hundred DressesIn this way, Each Kindness is very different from the story it echoes, The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes.  Chloe does not experience the kind of closure that Peggy and Maddie find after Wanda moves away.  As an adult reader I appreciate Chloe’s less-than-happy ending, but I am hesitant to say that children will enjoy this conclusion.  I am not sure what to do with the first person narration from Chloe’s point of view, and I think that Maddie’s reflections on her behavior toward Wanda are much more insightful.   The steps Maddie takes to set things right prove cathartic.  Also, much is revealed about Wanda in the course of The Hundred Dresses, whereas Chloe learns nothing about Maya—did she have siblings?  Who were her parents?  What kind of strange food did she eat at lunch?  Why did she go away?

Unfortunately, Maya is forgettable as a character, and while Woodson’s point may be the lesson Chloe learns, I am unsure of the lesson a young reader will take away from the story.

Yet I think Each Kindness has potential, particularly as a concise variation of The Hundred Dresses.  As part of a larger character education curriculum or as a one-off lesson on kindness, this book subtly raises the issue of bullying from the bully’s perspective.

Discussion Points* for Each Kindness:

*I thought up these questions with 7-8 year olds in mind.  Please share your adaptations for younger or older children and/or the highlights of your discussions of the book.

  • Chloe is observant.  When the principal introduces Maya, Chloe notices that Maya’s coat is open, her clothes are “old and ragged,” and she wears broken “spring shoes” in the winter.  When you meet someone for the first time, what are some of the things that you notice?  What would you like other people to notice about you?
  • “You can’t judge a book by its cover.”  What does this saying mean to you?  Do you agree or disagree?  How would you change the saying to be about people?
  • Chloe and her friends whisper and laugh about the strange food Maya brings for lunch.  What kind of food would be strange for a kid to bring to school for lunch?
  • New clothes and toys seem to matter a lot to Maya’s classmates.  Why do you think they prefer new things?
  • Andrew seems to be taunting Chloe when he says she has a new friend and Chloe tells him that Maya is not her friend.  Chloe’s best friends are Kendra and Sophie.  How many friends should a person have?  With your school friends, how does it work if someone makes a new friend?  How does it work if someone does not want to be friends with someone else?
  • What are some kind things that you have done for others?
  • What emotions do you think Chloe feels…when it is her turn to drop the stone into the water?  …when she decides to smile at Maya? …when she learns Maya has moved away?

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Are You Ready to Play Outside?

Written and Illustrated by Mo Willems.

Hyperion Press, 2008.  64 pages.  Tr.  $8.99.  ISBN 978-1-4231-1347-8.

Mo Willems’ beloved Piggie and Gerald are back and eager to play outside.  Except that it is raining.  Disappointed, Piggie frets about what to do.  When Gerald timidly suggests a way that they can still have fun, the day is saved, proving “elephants make the best friends!”

This Elephant and Piggie Book is perfect for beginning readers who are building confidence in their new skills.  The pair is delightfully expressive in the tradition of emergent reader texts from Dr. Seuss and P.D. Eastman.

Other Information:

Awards won by this item

Author/Illustrator website

Author/Illustrator biography and interviews

Subjects/themes that could be used in programming

  • Friendship
  • Rainy day
  • Emergent reader titles

Series Information

Programming Ideas and/or lesson plans

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Filed under Picture Books, Reading Aloud

Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

Written and Illustrated by Simms Taback.

Viking Juvenile, 1999.  32 pages.  Tr. $16.99.  ISBN 978-0-670-87855-0.

Using the die cut technique he popularized in his book There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, Simms Taback presents another award winning story, this one about a Jewish farmer named Joseph whose resourcefulness allows him to continually remake his overcoat into something new.  Taback’s inspiration for the story comes from a Yiddish folksong which is included at the end of the book.  Young readers will enjoy the predictable pattern of the text, and older readers will find numerous interesting bits of Jewish culture sprinkled throughout the richly textured illustrations.  A joyful story with a moral readers of all cultures can take to heart.

Cited in Essentials of Children’s Literature 6th Edition pages 94, 97, 113, 224, 311 and the 2000 Caldecott Medal winner:

Other Information:

Other in-print formats available for this title:

  • Gagne, P.R. & Reilly, M. (Producers) & Ivanick, D. (Director).  (2001).  Joseph had a

little overcoat .  Norwalk, CT:  Weston Woods.

Awards won by this item

Author/Illustrator website

Author/Illustrator biographies

Subjects/themes that could be used in programming

  • Jewish culture
  • Reusing Resources
  • Folk songs

Programming Ideas and/or lesson plans

Additional Resources

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The Man Who Walked Between the Towers

Written and Illustrated by Mordicai Gerstein

Roaring Book Press, 2003.  40 pages.  Tr. $17.95.  ISBN 978-0-7613-1791-3.

Philippe Petit is a street performer who loves to entertain crowds with his juggling tricks and his unicycle.  His favorite trick is walking on a tightrope high above the ground.  Once, in his hometown of Paris, France, Philippe walked (and even danced!) on a wire between the steeples of Notre Dame Cathedral.  Now living in New York, Philippe spots twin towers, each 1,340 feet tall.  And he has an idea…

Mordicai Gerstein recounts the remarkable story of Philippe Petit who, on August 7, 1974, walked on a wire strung between the towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.  Gerstein’s ink and oil illustrations capture Petit’s charisma and daring, as well as the astonishing height of the towers.  The post-9/11 perspective of this story preserves the memory of Petit’s amazing feat and the magnificence of the World Trade Center.  This book may serve as an introduction to 9/11 history for children born after 2001.

Other Information:

Other in-print formats available for this title:

  • Gerstein, M.  The man who walked between the towers [compact disc]. (2005).  Pine Plains, NY:  Live Oak Media.
  • Sporn, M. (Director). (2005). The man who walked between the towers [DVD]. Norwalk, CT:  Weston Woods Studios, Incorporated.

Awards won by this item

Author/Illustrator website

Author/Illustrator biographies

Subjects/themes that could be used in programming

  • Tight rope walker
  • Street Performer
  • 9/11

Programming Ideas and/or lesson plans

Additional Resources

Gallery of Mordicai Gerstein’s art:  http://www.rmichelson.com/Artist_Pages/Gerstein/Mordicai_Gerstein_Gallery.html

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Battle Bullying with Books

Starting Young

Last week, my daughter told me about a troubling recess incident at her school:  apparently, a game of “Lego City Police” devolved into the playground version of police brutality.  Teachers were alerted and intervened but not before one of my daughter’s kindergarten classmates was punched and scratched by another kid.

In her responses to my “casual” questions, my daughter revealed that the boy who was punched/scratched is not well liked among his peers.  She says the other boys don’t like him because he doesn’t brush his teeth.  The only girl police officer in the game, my daughter backed away when the punching started and didn’t know what to do.  The boy who did the punching/scratching has often been sent to the principal’s office but my daughter thinks he is silly and says funny things in class.

Wow.  All this just in time for No Name Calling Week.

Bullying Statistics

Some parents may feel it is an overreaction on my part to be concerned that the Lego City Police incident could be a precursor to bullying.  However, the statistics are alarming:  160,000 students per day skip school in fear of attack or bullying; out of 37 studied shootings, 66% of them were led by individuals who felt bullied; and 20% of high school students say they’ve considered suicide within the past twelve months, mentioning the triggers as bullying, teasing, and social rejection.  (These figures are borrowed from a library colleague; I didn’t ask for her sources).

The messages sent to my daughter and her classmates about this incident matter.  The time to address these issues is now, and the time to lay the foundation for the prevention of future bullying is now.

Don’t just read.  Discuss what you read.

My way of addressing issues typically involves books and I am familiar with the skepticism toward my approach:  can books really change the world?  Can reading really change lives?

Jenny Betz, Education Manager for GLSEN, suggested a different spin on these questions yesterday in “Battle Bullying with Books,” a webinar sponsored by Booklist.  Betz says that perhaps not the books themselves but the conversations around those books are what truly have the power to change lives.

One of my favorite aspects of teaching is listening to young people talk about issues of importance to them.  With civil discourse eroding before our eyes and disturbingly venomous speech flying around, it feels increasingly important to teach youth how to engage in respectful conversation with others.  I think using literature to open up dialogue is a great place to start.

Alone, the act of reading will not teach a child how to recognize and understand his emotions, will not create empathy.    But coupled with discussion, reading can help foster sensitivity and healthy relationships.

The thing to remember with discussion is that being “right” isn’t the point.  It’s more important to understanding what the other person is saying.  We adults are so eager to impart wisdom to young people that sometimes we talk too much.  We want young people to listen to us, but we often fail to reciprocate and truly listen to them.

All It Takes is One

In the past decade, innumerable titles have been published that deal with the subject of bullying for kids of all ages.  Last year author Mitali Perkins compiled a list of great titles for young adults (ages 12+).  For emergent readers (ages 5-8) the recent Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker by Geoffrey Hayes is a good one and the upcoming The Three Bully Goats by Leslie Kimmelman seems promising.  James Howe, author of Bunnicula, published The Misfits in 2001  for middle grade readers.  Loosely based on his daughter’s experience at the hands of middle school bullies, The Misfits is the book that launched No Name Calling Week.

My personal favorite is One by Kathryn Otoshi, published in 2008 by KO Kids Books.   This profound picture book is accessible for very young children but has an elegant, Zen flair that makes it appealing for tweens and teens as well.  Every preschool and elementary school library needs a copy of this book, and it would make a terrific teacher gift as well.  (Coincidentally, I had given my daughter’s teacher a copy of One earlier this month.  She read it to the class this week and the kids’ response to it was very encouraging.)

Summary:   Generally, Blue feels happy and life is good.  Except when Red gets mad and takes it out on Blue.  Those are the times when Blue feels, well, blue.  And Red sometimes makes Orange, Purple, Green, and Yellow feel blue too.  Red is a bully but the other colors don’t quite know what to do about it until One comes along and teaches an important lesson—that everyone counts!

Counting by ones may seem like a slow process—one book, one teacher, one kid, one parent—but we never know which one moment can be a turning point.  I, for one, don’t want to allow a single opportunity to slip by.

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No One Walks on My Father’s Moon

Written by Chara Curtis
Illustrated by Rebecca Hyland

A bright, eager Turkish schoolboy excitedly relays to his father the amazing thing he learned in class:  astronauts have landed on the moon!  The boy is shocked and dismayed at his father’s furious, violent reaction.  Americans may be touting this “giant leap for mankind,” but in some cultures to speak of—even to conceive of!—walking on “the face of God’s shining light” is nothing less than blasphemy.  In this profound and moving story, the boy faces the challenge of reconciling knowledge with belief.
Ages 8+
5 Flags
 
More to the story:
This book, unfortunately, is out of print, though I was able to obtain a copy through Amazon.  I encountered the story through the latest issue of Tikkun magazine which featured an article by children’s literature professor Graeme Wend-Walker.  The article, entitled “Reaching for the Moon:  A Children’s Book Author Challenges the Separation of Science and Religion,” discusses the plot and provides insightful commentary on the themes of education, religious belief, and reconciliation.

Wend-Walker also comments on the ways in which children’s literature is uniquely capable not only of addressing the prickly subjects of science and religion, but also of guiding young readers in their navigation of this increasingly important landscape.

In the case of No One Walks on My Father’s Moon, an elegant example of the ways in which picture books can make an outstanding contribution to the literary world, I recommend that adults use the story to open dialogue among themselves as well as with young people.  Religious education settings within any faith tradition would be particularly conducive to such conversation. 

(Interestingly, when I was linking the image to the Amazon page, I saw an impassioned review criticizing the very aspects of this book which I find so necessary to discuss.  Click here to see my response.)

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Filed under Periodicals, Picture Books

Booklist: Bullying

I’ve been following the case of Phoebe Prince, the 15 year-old Irish girl who committed suicide in January of this year after enduring a months-long bullying campaign staged by her Massachusetts high school peers.

Certainly there are numerous articles containing “tips” on how to identify, cope with and prevent bullying.  This booklist is intended to open up dialogue at various age levels on the subject.

For 4-8 year olds:

Hugo and the Bully Frogs
Written by Francesca Simon
Illustrated by Caroline Jean Church

Hugo is a little frog with a little croak.  He lives in a deep, muddy pond.  And he’s constantly tormented by Pop-Eyes, the biggest, meanest frog Hugo has ever met.  Pop-Eyes snatches Hugo’s toys, calls him names, and drops him head-first into the pond.  How will Hugo ever stand up to such a bully?
4 Flags

The Recess Queen
Written by Alexis O’Neill
Illustrated by Laura Huliska-Beith

Mean Jean dominates the playground.  She goes first at swinging, bouncing and kicking, and no one risks challenging her.  Then a new kid arrives at school.  Katie Sue doesn’t know that Jean is the reigning recess queen.  So what will happen when Katie Sue decides to swing, bounce and kick first?
4 Flags

For Ages 9+

Buddha Boy
by Kathe Koja

Jinsen, known around school as “Buddha Boy,” is increasingly targeted in mean-spirited, violent bullying by the popular crowd.  Read the full review here.
4 Flags

For Ages 15+

Twisted
by Laurie Halse Anderson

After years of being bullied, Tyler considers using violence to make himself heard.
Read the full review here.
5 Flags

For Parents and Educators

The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander
by Barbara Coloroso

Coloroso discusses in depth the parts enacted in each incident of bullying (including cyberbullying):  the perpetrator, the victim, the bystander, the adults, and the community context.  This book emphasizes ways in which the cycle of bullying can be broken.  Read the full review here.
5 Flags

For Deeper Reflection

Tikkun Passover Supplement 2010 (Click to link to the full text.)

“As we sit at the Seder table we need to discuss how ancient liberation for the Jews can inspire liberation today for all people.”  So begins the Passover supplement.

How are the Seder and Jewish liberation relevant for non-Jews?  Why is this Passover supplement included on a reading list about bullying?

This piece of reflection from Rabbi Michael Lerner calls the Jewish people—indeed, all people– to open “their eyes to the suffering of our brothers and sisters, the Palestinians,”  to “the ways in which we…have been acting as Pharoah to another people.”  Clearly, bullying is not a problem contained on school grounds.

In fact, bullying occurs on school grounds precisely because it happens on a larger scale in our communities.  Prosperous nations bully developing nations, and powerful companies bully smaller businesses.  Certain adults bully those weaker than themselves.

In all its manifestations, bullying is nothing less than a serious form of oppression.  And so discussion of liberation can move us forward, closer to “communal vision of what messianic redemption would look like,” no matter what our particular faith tradition might be.

As Rabbi Lerner writes, “Instead of relying on domination, we know both from our holy texts and from our real-world experience that it is generosity, kindness, compassion, and caring for others that will be the key to our success and survival.”

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Booklist:  St. Patrick’s Day Picture Books
All titles ages 3+

My mom, an Irish New Yorker, picked out these four St. Patrick’s Day books for my daughter this year.  Thanks, Mom!  We love them!

Jack and the Leprechaun
Written by Ivan Robertson
Illustrated by Katy Bratu

A family of field mice are preparing for St. Patrick’s Day in their village in the Irish countryside, and cousin Jack is coming all the way from America to join in the celebrations.  When the family sends Jack out to gather shamrocks for the festivities, Jack encounters a creature unlike any he’s ever seen.  But will his family believe him when he returns to tell his tale?
Little Lit Lover says:  I like the mice and the surprise that Liam the Leprechaun leaves for them.
3 Flags

King Puck Inspired by an Irish festival
Written and Illustrated by Michael Garland


Seamus is a solitary farmer living on a mountain above the town of Killorglin with only his goat Finny for company.  One night a band of fairies casts a spell on Finny, giving Seamus the surprise of his life.  The fairies mischief comes just in time for the March 17th crowning of King Puck, a Killorglin tradition honoring the best goat.  A charming story with beautiful illustrations, and every book lover will love Seamus and Finny’s happy ending.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like finding the fairies hidden in the pictures.
4 Flags

St. Patrick’s Day
Written and Illustrated by Gail Gibbons


A non-fiction narrative that introduces the traditions of St. Patrick’s Day and St. Patrick himself to young readers.  Includes short summaries of legends connected to St. Patrick.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like how St. Patrick talks about Jesus with a shamrock.
4 Flags

That’s What Leprechauns Do
Written by Eve Bunting
Illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully


Ari, Boo and Col have serious leprechaun duties.  They have to place the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.  But along the way the three little people can’t resist some silly antics, like tying up long-johns left out to dry and slipping a tennis ball into a hen’s nest.  Afterall, “that’s what leprechauns do!”
Little Lit Lover says:  These leprechauns are funny!  I like what they do to the cow.
4 Flags

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Young Cat Lover’s Booklist (Part 3)

Booklist:  Cats

Ages 4-8, Unless otherwise noted 

Be sure to check out Part 1 and Part 2!

Cat
Written by Matthew van Fleet
Photographed by Brian Stanton

A rhyming list of a variety of cats to accompany fantastic photographs.  Pull tabs, flaps and textures enhance the tactile experience of this book.  The highlight:  30+ breeds featured in on the final fold out pages.  Age 2+
Little Lit Lover says:  I like the cat that hides in the boot and the little mouse.
4 Flags

The Cat in the Hat
Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

No booklist on cats would be complete without the most famous literary feline of all!    220—that’s the number of words Dr. Seuss incorporated into this zany story in which, on a rainy day, two siblings are at home alone with nothing to do until a mischievous  cat materializes and proceeds to stir things up.  Excellent reading practice for beginning readers.
5 Flags

Eyewitness Cat
Written by Juliet Clutton-Brock

From the DK encyclopedic series, Cat covers the origins and evolutionary history of cats, the anatomy of cats including their “supersenses,” big cats and their natural habitats, various breeds of domestic cats, and more.  A great reference book most suitable for ages 8+, but also a good way to expose younger children to non-fiction reading.
Little Lit Lover says: I like the page with the cat skeletons where you can see all their bones.
5 Flags

Meet Trouble (All Aboard Reading 1)
Written by Susan Hood
Illustrated by Kristina Stephenson

Young Emily loves her aptly-named kitten Trouble who engages in typical feline explorations in this simple story with rhyming words and repetition to build early reading skills.  There is nothing special about this book, but with so many titles for beginning readers these days, this one is a safe choice for a child who can’t get enough of kittens and cats.  Ages 4-6
Little Lit Lover says:  It’s funny when Trouble tries to get his reflection in the mirror.
3 Flags

Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats
Written by T.S. Eliot
Illustrated by Axel Scheffler

In “The Naming of Cats,” “The Old Gumbie Cat,” “Gus: the Theatre Cat,” and a dozen other charming poems, Eliot celebrates the quirks of a host of loveable felines, reminding readers “That Cats are much like you and me / And other people whom we find / Possessed of various types of mind.”  In this edition, Scheffler’s fresh illustrations breathe new life into a beloved collection.  A great way to introduce poetry to new readers.  Enrich the reading experience by listening to the Cats soundtrack.  Age 5+
Little Lit Lover says:  My favorite poem is “Macavity the Mystery Cat” and my favorite picture is Jennyanydots with the mice.
5 Flags

Too Many Cats (Step into Reading 1)
Written by Lori Haskins Houran
Illustrated by Joe Mathieu

 A woman plays the cello near an open window in her home and the music attracts the cats of the neighborhood that soon join in with music of their own.  A decent beginning reader book that contains a fair number of sight words.  It is not a phonics reader.  Ages 4-6
Little Lit Lover says:  I like when the white cat turns green!

3 Flags

This concludes the young cat lover’s booklist!  “You’ve read of several kinds of Cat, / And my opinion now is that / You should need no interpreter / To understand their character.” ~ from “The Ad-Dressing of Cats” by T.S. Eliot

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Young Cat Lover’s Booklist (Part 2)

Booklist:  Cats

Ages 4-8, unless otherwise noted

Don’t miss Part 1!

Ballet Kitty:  Ballet Class
Written by Bernette Ford
Illustrated by Sam Williams

Ballet Kitty and her two friends, Princess Pussycat and Ginger Tom, are off to their first ballet lesson with Mademoiselle Felicity.  Ballet Kitty has a new leotard, tutu and tights and—of course—ballet slippers that she is excited to wear.  Ginger Tom has new ballet slippers too, but he’s not sure about wearing them for class.  But the three kitties work hard, prancing and plié-ing and pointing their toes.  More about ballet than cats, this is nonetheless a cute story.  A great primer for little dancers about to take class for the first time, and I especially love the inclusion of a boy dancer.  Age 3+
Little Lit Lover says:  I like how they do all the things I do in ballet class:  the positions and plié and tendu! 
4 Flags

If You Give a Cat a Cupcake
Written by Laura Numeroff
Illustrated by Felicia Bond

For some, snack time isn’t a simple matter of giving a cat a cupcake, especially if the cat wants sprinkles with his cupcake.  Before you know it, you’ll have been to the beach, the gym and the museum!  A fun companion book to If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, and observant readers will be able to spot Mouse in this book.  A favorite in our household.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like when the cat rides on a whale and when he tries to carry a lot of stuff.
5 Flags

I Love Cats
Written and Illustrated by Barry Saltzberg

I Love Cats is narrated by a girl in purple pajamas who loves cats of all colors, as well as all standard kitty antics (pouncing, purring, prowling, pawing, etc),  and hopes you do too.  There is no plot to this book, and the pictures are also simple.  An okay book for a beginning reader, but not worth much beyond that.  I’d say this book would delight a young cat lover if discovered in the waiting room at the doctor’s office.  Age 3+
Little Lit Lover says: I like the cat who’s trying to get his shadow.
3 Flags

The Shy Little Kitten
Written by Cathleen Schurr
Illustrated by Gustaf Tenggren

The shy little kitten is born on a farm in a litter of six.  All the kittens live comfortably in the hay barn with their mother until the day they are old enough to line up and venture out.  The shy little kitten hangs back and finds herself at the end of the line.  She is distracted from following her family by a mole who pops up in her path, and quickly falls behind.  Since she can’t see where her family went, the kitten tags along with the mole and they meet a frog, a puppy and a squirrel before the kitten decides she ought to find her mother.  When she does come upon her family, the kitten finds a surprise waiting for her.  Not sure why the kitten is described as “shy” since she’s actually quite curious and adventurous.  This is a decent story, nothing special, with predictable baby animal adventures.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like the part when she meets the mole.
3 Flags

Splat the Cat
Written and Illustrated by Rob Scotton

Splat is nervous about starting school.  In fact he is so nervous he’ll think up any excuse not to go:  no clean socks, bad hair day, lamppost in the way.  When he finally arrives at school, one of Splat’s first lessons teaches that cats chase mice, and Splat’s anxiety grows.  He has his pet mouse, Seymour, in his lunchbox!  What will happen at lunchtime when Splat reveals his friend?  And will Splat ever want to return to school again?  Great harmony between text and illustrations makes this a very entertaining read.  Splat is another great character from the creator of Russell the Sheep.
Little Lit Lover says:  Splat makes funny faces!
5 Flags

Wabi Sabi
Written by Mark Reibstein
Illustrated by Ed Young

Wabi Sabi is a cat from Kyoto, Japan.  When she overhears her master say that her name is hard to understand, Wabi Sabi sets off to consult with some wise animals who might be able to explain the concept to her.  (“Wabi sabi” refers to the notion of finding beauty in the ordinary.)  This book opens vertically, giving each spread the feel of an unfurled Asian scroll. A haiku and Japanese verse appear on each spread, and the collage-style artwork give the illusion of texture and dimension.  Because of the abstract concept behind wabi sabi, this story may not appeal to young readers (hence 4 flags), but it is a gorgeous book that would be enjoyed by anyone with a love of cats and Asian culture.
Little Lit Lover says:  I like to say “wabi sabi!”
4 Flags

Part 3 coming soon!

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